Digital NomadLifestyle

Five exotic destinations inviting remote workers, including Barbados and Bermuda

By September 27, 2020 No Comments

Working from home has become the new normal for many of us due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

While some have struggled to adapt to this new working mode, others have come to the welcome realisation that their job requirements can be completed from anywhere and are beginning to explore their options.

As a result, a number of exotic destinations which have seen their tourism revenue pretty much vanish over the past few months are using the situation to their advantage by offering extended visas to remote workers in a bid to inject money into their economies.

From Anguilla to Barbados, here are five of the most alluring destinations currently vying for remote workers.

Anguilla

Renowned for its coral reefs and stand out beaches, Anguilla is a stunning place to visit.

Thanks to a new initiative, remote workers now have the option to live and work on the 90-square-kilometre Caribbean island.

The British Overseas Territory is offering up extended visas in a bid to lure “digital nomads” over.

According to the Anguilla Tourist Board, successful applicants will be permitted to spend between three months and a year in the country.

Remote workers now have the option to live and work on the 90-square-kilometre Caribbean island. Credit: Getty Images

While anyone can apply, Anguilla, which has recorded just three COVID-19 cases and no fatalities, is giving priority to those from countries deemed “low risk” – where the coronavirus “prevalence” is less than 0.2 per cent.

Applications are currently being accepted from those who plan to arrive on the island by October 31.

Those who hope to arrive after this date can apply at the end of September.

The fee, which covers two COVID-19 tests as well as a digital work permit, is $1,400 (US$1,000) for individuals staying under three months or $2,800 (US$2,000) for those staying between three months and a year.

A family of four staying under three months will be required to pay a $2,100 (US$1,500) fee, which increases to $4,200 (US$3,000) if they plan to be on the island between three and 12 months.

Aruba

Aruba is also offering itself up as a haven for those currently working from home.

However, its “One Happy Workation” program is specifically aimed at US travellers.

Open to anyone with a valid US passport, the newly launched program permits workers to live and work in Aruba for up to 90 days, while offering special rates at a range of hotels and resorts, with benefits such as free Wi-Fi and all-inclusive meals, concessions and experiential add-ons.

Although there isn’t a fee for the program which aims to “generate revenue for Aruban businesses and help boost the local economy”, candidates must book one of the accommodation packages for a minimum of seven days in order to qualify.

Aruba is also offering itself up as a haven for those currently working from home. 
Aruba is also offering itself up as a haven for those currently working from home.  Credit: Getty Images

Renaissance Aruba Resort & Casino, Hilton Aruba Caribbean Resort & Casino and the Ritz-Carlton, Aruba are among the participating accommodation.

Applicants also need to be employed by a company or registered as self-employed in their home country and are not allowed to render services to and receive income from any Aruban company or individual without an additional work or business permit.

However, they will not be liable to pay income tax in Aruba.

Visitors to Aruba must adhere to the island’s COVID-19 entry requirements, such as purchasing Aruba Visitors Insurance, which costs around $21 per person each day.

The program has received a strong response since its launch, according to a spokesman for the Aruba Tourism Authority.

Barbados

Barbados was one of the first Caribbean destinations to launch an attractive program for remote workers in the wake of the pandemic.

The “12-month Barbados Welcome Stamp”, announced in July, offers travellers the chance to transfer their home office to the beautiful island for up to a year.

“COVID-19 has changed the global business landscape as a larger number of people continue to work from home,” Barbados Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley said in a statement.

“With this new visa, we can provide workers with an opportunity to spend the next 12 months working remotely from paradise, here in Barbados.”

Barbados was one of the first Caribbean destinations to launch an attractive program for remote workers in the wake of the pandemic.
Barbados was one of the first Caribbean destinations to launch an attractive program for remote workers in the wake of the pandemic. Credit: Getty Images

Original post: Source link